Commentary

Wed
25
Feb

Repairing roads, bridges is worthy goal

By news editor Jeremy Waltner and publisher Tim L. Waltner
 
There are few things more important to South Dakota— and taken for granted— than our roads and bridges. Particularly in a rural state like ours, the infrastructure that enables us to travel safely and efficiently is vital. It is essential to our economy— agriculture and tourism, for example— and our quality of life— education and health care, for example. 

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Wed
25
Feb

Offering quality, affordable higher education

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard
 
Education after high school can be expensive. Over the past few decades, the cost of higher education has increased much faster than average inflation. The cost of things like food, housing and medical care have increased over the years, but, on average, not at the rate of college tuition.

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Wed
18
Feb

What’s your perception of a hitchhiker?

 
I was feeling a little stressed out after a long weekend. I travelled all  the way to California for a basketball tournament. I had to borrow money  from my parents because I had not received my income tax return yet. Additionally my team lost out of the tournament and missed out on an anticipated share in the jackpot. With my last $60 I landed back in Spokane. I spent $10 on a sandwich and $16 on my airport parking. I left the airport parking lot and was  headed south, back towards Moscow (ID) where I go to school. I was still stressed thinking more about how  broke I would be after filling the gastank on my car. I barely had enough gas to get me home.

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Wed
18
Feb

Slices of Life: This week, we are the Nielsens

By Jill Pertler

I’ve never used a pen name or adopted an alias. My family’s not in the  witness protection program, which I’m assuming would necessitate a name change. But this week we are the Nielsens. It’s a moniker steeped in power, prestige and a TV viewing diary. The Nielsen in our house is the Nielsen Company, which establishes ratings and rankings for TV shows by  gathering information from regularpeople like us. Families are randomly selected and asked to participate  by keeping a TV viewing diary for seven days. People in large cities often have electronic monitoring devices attached to their TVs. Small town folks still complete diaries the oldfashioned way with pen, paper and the occasional writer’s cramp.

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Wed
11
Feb

City should consider getting out of internet business

The reasons for the City of Timber Lake to be in the internet business are becoming fewer. Maybe it’s time to exit. The history of Timber Lake Broadband, for those who don’t remember or never knew, speaks for itself. A review: The City first got into the internet business with  a $300,000 USDA grant designed to bring service to rural communities. At that time, most people
had dial-up service, which was fast becoming obsolete.
 
Wed
11
Feb

Learning more about education funding

LaVonne Milliken, 83, of Mobridge and formerly of Timber Lake passed away on Tuesday, February 10, 2015 at the Golden Living Center at Mobridge. Arrangemens are pending with Kesling Funeral Home of Mobridge.
 
Wed
04
Feb

Slices of Life: Well, I never…

By Jill Pertler
People have their bucket lists – things they want to do before they, you know, kick the bucket. And, people have lists of goals – also things they want to do. But how about a list of “I nevers?” You know, things you’ve never done, and probably never will – but you never know. I started this list a while ago, and then happened to see it played as a game on a TV talk show where the guests answered honestly whether they’d never been to a nude beach, never been arrested or never seen one 
another naked. My nevers are decidedly less moviestar and more G-rated. Although I never have been to a nude beach.
 
Wed
04
Feb

State regulation of insurance

Insurance is a regulated business in this country, with the states being the primary regulators. There is a unique history as to how and why the states have maintained this role. In 1868, the United States Supreme Court ruled that insurance was not a “transaction of commerce,” meaning Congress did not have Constitutional authority to enact laws regulating it.  onsequently, the states adopted their own methods of regulating the industry.
 
Wed
28
Jan

Fourth graders write persuasive letter to Superintendent

Wed
28
Jan

Slices of Life: Big game, bigger commercials

By Jill Pertler
 
It’s the time of year when the term “F-word” takes on a whole new meaning. Especially if, like me, you reside in a home with a bunch of football fanatics. For most of the season, their fervor doesn’t impact me. I leave them to their games on the big screen (with booming surround sound) and find myself a nice crime or home improvement show on the small TV upstairs. (Or maybe take a nap.) It’s not that I don’t understand or appreciate football. I do. I can provide an audible definition for terms like false start, face mask and flea flicker. I know a first down is better than a fourth down, but not as good as a touchdown, and they call it the line of scrimmage for a reason. I am familiar with the yellow hanky (which is not used for blowing one’s nose) and know the final two minutes of the game can last as long as the entire first half. At least it seems that way.
 

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