Commentary

Wed
21
May

Happiness and Freedom

By Daris Howard.
 
I was living in a community that decided to run a memorial exhibit on the Holocaust. I felt it would be a good learning experience for my family. When we reached the exhibit, we each randomly drew a name. We put on a tag with that name, and we were supposed to address each other accordingly.

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Wed
14
May

South Dakota paying off debt, not borrowing more

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard.
 
These days, we hear a lot about government debt. When times get tough, and balancing the budget must be done, states like Illinois and California incur debt to cover routine annual government expenses. Of course, in Washington, D.C., Congress routinely borrows money to fund the federal budget. A more responsible approach uses government debt (bonds) for construction projects.
 
Wed
14
May

Food Allergy Awareness Week: Read ingredient labels

Food allergies are on the rise everywhere and chances are you know someone with food allergies. Three and a half years ago my son was diagnosed with a peanut allergy at the age of 2½. He has never had an anaphylactic reaction, but has an Epi-Pen (which is an epinephrine injector) just in case. I have learned a lot about food allergies in that time, particularly on how to read a food label. If you don’t habitually read ingredient labels, take a look the next time you go grocery shopping.
 
Wed
07
May

Mothers weave families together

By Karen Holzer.
 
A mother sings a lullaby as she cradles her infant. The melody echoes from the voices of her mother and grandmother as they rocked their babies. A mother smiles and hugs her little girl, saying she is a chatterbox just like her Aunt Judy. A mother pulls the lemon jelly roll recipe from the box of tattered, hand written cards as she prepares the special dessert for Easter dinner, just as her grandmother did.
 
Wed
07
May

Extension Service: A century of thoughtful service

Gov. Dennis Daugaard.
 
Each week, all over South Dakota, groups of boys and girls gather in community centers, living rooms, church fellowship halls and school gymnasiums, where they recite a pledge. It goes, in part, “I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service and my health to better living.”
 
Wed
30
Apr

Looking back and pushing forward

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard.
 
Over a century ago in 1879, a man by the name of Adam Royhl decided to make his way west to the Dakota Territory. At age 21, the pioneer left his family and everything he knew to pursue the opportunities in what would become South Dakota. Royhl traveled from his home in Wisconsin to Marshall, Minn., by train, and then made the journey to Arlington by foot. As he walked, Royhl depended on the kindness of strangers for food and shelter, and he spent one night sleeping on a haystack.
 
Wed
30
Apr

Who’s going to mind the ranch?

By Ron Silverman, Broker.
 
Your decision to include, or exclude, the next generation in your family business can mean the difference of whether your ranch survives or fades away, when you are ready to (and desire to) retire. Young adults need to be educated in the knowledge of the family’s assets – financial, vocational, and historical – to create an enduring legacy that is not only chosen by your children, but continues to be valued by them.
 
Wed
23
Apr

Set the rules, explain the consequences

By Tracy Renee Lee.
 
Teens are at far greater risk of death in an alcoholrelated crash than the overall population, despite the fact they cannot legally purchase or publicly possess alcohol. On the average over the last five years, one-fourth of the deaths in motor vehicle crashes occurred when a teen driver had a BAC (blood alcohol content) of .01 or higher.
 
Wed
23
Apr

Pushing Up Daisies: Obituaries serve a purpose

By Tracy Renee Lee.
 
Occasionally, I work with a family wishing to forgo the printing of the death announcement, a.k.a. obituary, in the newspaper. Before becoming a funeral practitioner, I, as these families, thought obituaries unnecessary and a bit obsolete, especially if the decedent’s circles of friends and family were small. I  have a rather small group of immediate and intimate friends and family, and have thought in the past, that when my time comes, the printing of an obituary would be unnecessary. After becoming a funeral director and working with families for a few years, my opinion of the necessity of an obituary notice, printed in the newspaper, has most definitely changed. It is a small bit of money, very well spent.
 
Thu
17
Apr

Consider a future in South Dakota

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard.
 
The recession brought tougher times for young adults across the nation. More people than ever are attending technical schools and colleges, but when they finish, some are having a difficult time finding jobs and repaying student loans. While this has been a national phenomenon, the prospects for a young graduate are much, much better in South Dakota for a number of reasons.

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