Commentary

Thu
30
May
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Statement from Chairman Frazier regarding Herrera v. Wyoming

Today (May 22) the United States Supreme Court decided to rule on a very important case involving treaty rights. While the basic arguments within the case can be picked apart and subjected to opinion and interpretation, there remains a much more important message. The treaties made between the United States and Native Nations are important documents that determine much more than many people realize.

Treaties made are not merely “Indian” treaties, but United States treaties that are guaranteed under Article 6 of the United States constitution as the “supreme law of the land.” All laws are to be made “in pursuant thereof” and not conflict with the Constitution and treaties. Too often the rights outlined in treaties have been abused by the Federal government with laws and legislation that conflict with the treaties.

Thu
30
May
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Enjoy your West River Summer issue

Welcome to West River Summer!

As I’m writing this, the sun has peeked out to make an appearance between rain showers. It seems odd in a way to be readying for summer when this spring has been mostly waiting for this wet season of late snows, endless rain showers and mud (so much mud) to be over so we can all get to our branding and planting and yard work and everything else.

This year’s issue of WRS has a whopping 32 pages and three sections of local content, some of which I’ll summarize below.

Angie Jones has once again contributed some fun and thoughtful articles.

Angie interviewed Lakota elder Virginia White Feather, who spoke about being a native Lakota speaker until she was required to attend Agency school, Lakota values for modern times, her family, and more.

 

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition https://www.etypeservices.com/Timber%20Lake%20TopicID443/

Thu
23
May
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Healing or harming?

Prairie Doc

By Richard P. Holm, MD

Just about 4000 years ago, Chinese writings explained the medicinal powers of what is now called cannabis or marijuana, describing its properties to help arthritis, gout, malaria, nausea and psychological stress. In the 1500s and 1600s the Spanish and English brought cannabis to the new world for medical purposes and it became a huge commercial crop for making rope. In the 1920s cannabis emerged in jazz clubs as a recreational drug. At the time, it was thought of as a better alternative to alcohol since cannabis users didn’t seem as disruptive to the community.

Thu
23
May
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Lorenda speaks for the team

STUDENT VOICES

Timber Lake senior Lorenda Long delivered the following remarks when she and Ty Ducheneaux presented Coach Jordan Weisbeck with a star quilt at the high school awards day program on May 8. Weisbeck and his wife Katie, third grade teacher, will be moving to Eureka.

I am honored to be able to share the memories and life long lessons my team and I gained from Mr. Weisbeck over the years as having him as a basketball coach.

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition https://www.etypeservices.com/Timber%20Lake%20TopicID443/

Thu
16
May
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The community of White Horse matters

By Jaylee Schoelerman

The community of White Horse matters to me, to my family, and to South Dakota.

My great great-great-great-great-grandfather, a French trader, came to trade with the Lakota people. The location where the trading took place is the current site of White Horse. While there, he met, fell in love with, and married a Lakota woman.

Together they began to raise a family and create a ranch that I currently live on today.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition https://www.etypeservices.com/Timber%20Lake%20TopicID443/

Thu
16
May
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My ranch matters

By Talley Locken

There are many reasons why I think that my ranch matters. There is a lot of history there. My ranch has a house on a hill that got struck by lightning. There was a family living in it and they all died. My great-great- great-grandpa Ole began the ranch a long time ago. He built all the fences and barns. I am the sixth generation to live on the ranch.

The Locken Ranch has animals living there. We have domestic animals— cows, horses, cats, dogs, and goats. There are also many wild animals roaming the ranch. We see jack rabbits, deer, antelope, wild cats, coyotes, mountain lions, mice, frogs, toads, and salamanders.

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition https://www.etypeservices.com/Timber%20Lake%20TopicID443/

Thu
09
May
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A Note on Motherhood

Stray Thoughts

Thu
09
May
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Why I hope to become just like my ma

GUEST COLUMN

I hope to be just like my mother one day.

Now in her eighth decade, my ma has arrived at a coveted place: Her "filter" is pretty much gone, and she has no problem telling anyone what's on her mind.

"Ma, please don't tell us any more details," my five sisters and I beg her, when she shares "way too much personal information" about her 63 years of marriage to my father.

"Cowards," she says with a snort.

My ma's passion is to teach the youngest members of her large clan the most important things in life (family, charity, doing unto others as you would have them do unto you) and to waste as little time as possible on the least important things (money, selfishness, giving too much weight to what others think of you).

 

 

Thu
02
May
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U.S. Supreme Court hears freedom of information case from South Dakota

GUEST COLUMN

To sit in the courtroom of the Supreme Court of the United States and watch the nine justices in action is one thing. To sit in the courtroom and watch the justices in action when the issue is about freedom of information and the public’s right to know in America is a privilege.

So it was on April 22 that I witnessed the Supreme Court hear oral arguments in the case of Food Marketing Institute v. Argus Leader Media. This case is about grocers and the federal government wanting to block the public release of information about government payments to businesses participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as the food stamps program.

Thu
25
Apr
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School and community team up

EDITORIAL

As I was interviewing Emily Reinbold Boden and Melissa Nehl Day for articles in our Health Outlook section (part of this week’s Topic) I was reminded of a quote from someone who said that when recruiting teachers, we should look within our own schools. Emily and Melissa are homegrown medical professionals, and there are many examples in the education field as well.

A quick count shows that of the 43 teachers currently working in the Timber Lake School, 21 went to high school at either Timber Lake or Isabel. That would seem to indicate that future recruits are right under our noses, perhaps in the seventh grade, waiting to be nurtured and invited into fulfilling careers in education, health care and other areas. Of course, they won’t all come home, and that’s okay; it’s good for communities to exchange talent with other towns.

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