Commentary

Thu
13
Jun
Edgar's picture

Prairie Doc Amazing medicine reverses aging

I bet I hear it once a week, “It’s hell to grow old!”

Of course, growing old is something we all will do, unless we die first. Alas, the future can look quite sad and depressing, especially if you think about the flab, falls, pain, blues, anxiety, thin bones, loss of libido, weakness, and memory loss that can come with aging.

But wait! Listen to the exciting news. Just out, there is a powerful potion that can prevent the aging process. That’s right…guaranteed to slow aging.

 

 

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Thu
13
Jun
Edgar's picture

Thanks to those who served, sacrificed

LETTER

To the editor:

Last Thursday, June 6, was the 75th Anniversary of D-Day. There was much coverage of the event nationally, and though I am a week late, I feel it is important that it be remembered and honored locally as well.

Thu
06
Jun
Edgar's picture

Refresh, recharge, rethink

EDITOR’S COLUMN

Refresh, recharge, rethink. That’s part of what a gathering of any professional group can offer. So it is with newspaper people.

Bob and I spent a couple days with colleagues at the joint convention of the South Dakota Newspaper Association and the North Dakota Newspaper Association last week. On alternate years we have a joint meeting, and the other years we each have our own convention.

Thu
06
Jun
Edgar's picture

Listening for God

Prairie Doc

How do any of us cope with the catastrophes of life? Years ago, a couple faced the tragedy of an accidental death of their only young child. Even though most marriages don’t survive such an insult, this one did. Between the woman and man, there was love, forgiveness, and plenty of help from the people of their church. The people of the congregation, like the wings of a mother hen, surrounded the couple with support, comfort, and warmth.

Thu
30
May
Edgar's picture

Statement from Chairman Frazier regarding Herrera v. Wyoming

Today (May 22) the United States Supreme Court decided to rule on a very important case involving treaty rights. While the basic arguments within the case can be picked apart and subjected to opinion and interpretation, there remains a much more important message. The treaties made between the United States and Native Nations are important documents that determine much more than many people realize.

Treaties made are not merely “Indian” treaties, but United States treaties that are guaranteed under Article 6 of the United States constitution as the “supreme law of the land.” All laws are to be made “in pursuant thereof” and not conflict with the Constitution and treaties. Too often the rights outlined in treaties have been abused by the Federal government with laws and legislation that conflict with the treaties.

Thu
30
May
Edgar's picture

Enjoy your West River Summer issue

Welcome to West River Summer!

As I’m writing this, the sun has peeked out to make an appearance between rain showers. It seems odd in a way to be readying for summer when this spring has been mostly waiting for this wet season of late snows, endless rain showers and mud (so much mud) to be over so we can all get to our branding and planting and yard work and everything else.

This year’s issue of WRS has a whopping 32 pages and three sections of local content, some of which I’ll summarize below.

Angie Jones has once again contributed some fun and thoughtful articles.

Angie interviewed Lakota elder Virginia White Feather, who spoke about being a native Lakota speaker until she was required to attend Agency school, Lakota values for modern times, her family, and more.

 

 

To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition https://www.etypeservices.com/Timber%20Lake%20TopicID443/

Thu
23
May
Edgar's picture

Healing or harming?

Prairie Doc

By Richard P. Holm, MD

Just about 4000 years ago, Chinese writings explained the medicinal powers of what is now called cannabis or marijuana, describing its properties to help arthritis, gout, malaria, nausea and psychological stress. In the 1500s and 1600s the Spanish and English brought cannabis to the new world for medical purposes and it became a huge commercial crop for making rope. In the 1920s cannabis emerged in jazz clubs as a recreational drug. At the time, it was thought of as a better alternative to alcohol since cannabis users didn’t seem as disruptive to the community.

Thu
23
May
Edgar's picture

Lorenda speaks for the team

STUDENT VOICES

Timber Lake senior Lorenda Long delivered the following remarks when she and Ty Ducheneaux presented Coach Jordan Weisbeck with a star quilt at the high school awards day program on May 8. Weisbeck and his wife Katie, third grade teacher, will be moving to Eureka.

I am honored to be able to share the memories and life long lessons my team and I gained from Mr. Weisbeck over the years as having him as a basketball coach.

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Thu
16
May
Edgar's picture

The community of White Horse matters

By Jaylee Schoelerman

The community of White Horse matters to me, to my family, and to South Dakota.

My great great-great-great-great-grandfather, a French trader, came to trade with the Lakota people. The location where the trading took place is the current site of White Horse. While there, he met, fell in love with, and married a Lakota woman.

Together they began to raise a family and create a ranch that I currently live on today.

 

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Thu
16
May
Edgar's picture

My ranch matters

By Talley Locken

There are many reasons why I think that my ranch matters. There is a lot of history there. My ranch has a house on a hill that got struck by lightning. There was a family living in it and they all died. My great-great- great-grandpa Ole began the ranch a long time ago. He built all the fences and barns. I am the sixth generation to live on the ranch.

The Locken Ranch has animals living there. We have domestic animals— cows, horses, cats, dogs, and goats. There are also many wild animals roaming the ranch. We see jack rabbits, deer, antelope, wild cats, coyotes, mountain lions, mice, frogs, toads, and salamanders.

 

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