Commentary

Wed
01
Feb

The Table — and family memories

By Jill Pertler

 

The Table has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember.

 

When I was a child, it was my fortress; I crawled under it, learning every crack and crevice from the underside. It seemed massive from my little girl perspective. Larger than life.
 
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Wed
25
Jan

Taking on the meth problem

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard
 
I recently heard a story about a young man who was exposed to meth as a child. The young man, named Chris, grew up around meth and the violence that the drug brings. Like any normal kid, he wanted attention from the adults in his life. But while most kids are trying to gain approval by getting good grades, making the basketball team or winning a role in the school play, at 12 years old Chris began to use and deal meth to receive that attention. Using and dealing led Chris to get into fights and to start stealing. At age 17, Chris overdosed. Meth is a problem in South Dakota. Like other states, we are seeing an increase in methamphetamine trafficking and more meth-related arrests and convictions. To address the epidemic, we need to stop meth from coming into our state, prevent meth use and help those who are addicted.
 

Wed
25
Jan

The Democratic View from Pierre - by the Minority Whip

Rep. Susan Wismer (D-Britton)
 
Percolating...that's the term I would use to describe this second week of the legislature. Very slowly, some would say. Several of my committee meetings were canceled this week for lack of proposed bills. But things ARE happening. Legislators and lobbyists and department heads are getting to know each other, bills are being "pitched," or discussed, between the legislators of the two political parties, the legislative and executive branch, and legislators and lobbyists. And the Legislative Research Council is madly trying to mold all these ideas into bills as quickly as possible. Hot topics floating around are "fixes" to Initiated Measure 22 (Yes, it does need fixing), juvenile justice reform, waterfowl hunting licenses, small school fixes to last year's funding formula.
 

Wed
18
Jan

Slices of Life: Rules for marriage

By Jill Pertler
 
I’ve been contemplating marriage. Not getting married. I took care of that task years ago. I’ve been contemplating marriage as in the concept of. My daughter recently tied the knot and I’ve been reminiscing about my own newlywed days – and some of the lessons learned since way back then.
 
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Wed
11
Jan

Prejudice and hate

By Richard P. Holm MD

The first day I met Amiel Redfish, a physician assistant, we discussed the overuse and overreliance on medicine in modern society, how great changes in longevity, through the years, came instead with proper sanitation, clean water, and the discovery of antibiotics. Although there have been great strides in health care throughout the years, none have resulted in such significant drops in the overall death rate as those. Redfish also expressed the value of the vigorous lifestyle of traditional American Indians and a diet closer to what was found in a hunter/gatherer’s world like roots, vegetables, berries and fruit, eggs, and wild game.

My colleague is a true Sioux Indian medicine man, a class act, and a dear friend. But despite the sagacity, insight, and traditional perspective he represents, I dare say there are those who, not knowing him, would look at his original American Indian features and prejudge him.

Wed
11
Jan

Slices of Life: A meaningful reward

By Jill Pertler

Never underestimate the power of a single piece of paper – especially if the paper in question is a (genuine and authentic) Certificate.

My first grader came home with such a document this week. He brings papers from school just about every day. They are crunched and bent to fit inside his backpack. His Certificate was neither creased nor folded. It was held, with great care and attentiveness, in his little hands, where he could keep it safe from the crowding and crinkling hazards lurking inside his backpack.

“It’s a Certificate! I got a Certificate at school today!” he practically shouted on his way in from the bus stop.

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Wed
04
Jan

I chose dignity

By Richard P. Holm, MD

An elderly late-80s gentleman came into the emergency room unconscious with the diagnosis of a new stroke. The CT of the head indicated there was no bleeding into or around the brain, indicating he had a blood clot, not a bleed that caused the acute brain injury.

Symptoms had begun six hours earlier, but the patient and his family just didn’t get to the emergency room in time to try a clot-busting medication that can sometimes save the brain. The family and I had a long talk. I discovered that the patient had been living alone in his home of 50 years, still visiting a nursing home every day to see his wife who had severe Alzheimer’s Disease.

Wed
04
Jan

On snowfall and looking forward to 2017

By Kathy Nelson

How does it compare? Locally, there’s been a lot of talk comparing this winter to the winter of 1996-97, when roads were clogged, power lines were toppled, and sub-zero temperatures and persistent winds resulted in significant damage and livestock losses.

While it’s too early to tell what things will look like by March or April, 2017, the snowfall so far this year is far behind January 1 of 20 years ago.

In 1996, there was 35.8 inches of snow by Dec. 16 and 44.1 inches by Dec. 31. There had been saturating rains in October and 12 inches of snow in November.

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Wed
21
Dec

A Christmas reminder

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard

Thu
15
Dec

Lower tax collections lead to lean budget

By Dana Hess

Gov. Dennis Daugaard presented a lean budget proposal to legislators on December 6, holding the line on spending due to sales tax collections that are projected to be lower than expected. The $1.62 billion general fund budget for fiscal year 2018 includes one percent increases for education, health care providers and state employees. The budget includes about $20 million in general fund spending increases.

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