Commentary

Thu
02
Aug
Edgar's picture

Some history of lenses

By Richard P. Holm, MD

The oldest known lens was found in the ruins of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Nineveh and was made from polished rock crystal. The Greek playwright Aristophanes mentions the use of such a lens to burn holes in parchment in one of his plays. Allegedly, Pliny the physician used a similar lens to cauterize wounds.

A thousand years later monks started using “reading stones” which were sliced off sections of polished quartz spheres. Sometime in the latter half of the 1200s the monks put these reading stones up on their noses in what today we would recognize as spectacles.

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Wed
25
Jul
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Promises Kept

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard

We had a lot of good news to share this week, all related to South Dakota’s outstanding financial condition. On Monday, we announced the close of the fiscal year with a surplus. On Tuesday, we got word that S&P is maintaining our AAA status. Then we learned on Wednesday that our Bureau of Finance and Management is being nationally recognized for its annual financial report.

The state’s finances have always been a top priority for me. When I campaigned for this job in 2010, it was the one thing I heard about wherever I went. We were coming out of the recession and, at the time, there was much attention on the federal deficit and the budget problems states faced nationwide.

 

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Wed
25
Jul
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Trade war poses real threat to agriculture

By Kathy Nelson

South Dakota’s Congressional delegation — all Republicans — are warning President Trump about the negative effects the trade war is having on agriculture.

In a joint letter to the President last week, Sen. John Thune, Sen. Mike Rounds and Rep. Kristi Noem, wrote, “We appreciate and support your administration’s efforts to address a broad spectrum of trade inequities. We do not support, however, making agriculture exports, which have been the exception to such trade inequities, bear the brunt of retaliatory actions in response to current U.S. trade policies. As you continue to pursue trade negotiations to address unfair trade practices and other trade barriers, we strongly urge you to make U.S. agricultural exports a priority of those negotiations and to negotiate with our trading partners to protect agriculture products from all existing and future tariffs.”

 

Wed
18
Jul
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Spruce up: Time to show our pride

Hey, Timber Lake and Isabel, you know what time of year it is. It’s that hurried, hectic time of year when we are getting ready for our two big celebration weekends. Timber Lake’s celebration starts with the Dewey County Fair and German supper and talent show on Thursday, July 26. Isabel starts Friday, August 3 with IHS alumni day and the ranch rodeo. That means we have just a few days to spruce things up so our towns look beautiful when visitors arrive.

 

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Wed
11
Jul
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Creating a community where people want to live

By Paula Jensen

I often hear jovial stories and stereotypes, in and out of rural places, about how small-town people are stuck in the 1960s and refuse to accept change. They joke that we nostalgically hang on to our traditions, our history, our ways of doing things, and our small-town values. Personally, I choose to live in a small town because it’s safe, close to family, and offers me the quality of life I need.

Wed
11
Jul
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Letter from the Editor

By  Margaret Salzer Pierre, SD

Tue
03
Jul
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Future of IHS must be made a priority

I was having a health issue a few months back and I had an appointment at Native Women’s Health on Good Friday. When I pulled up, in pain, I thought to myself, this place looks closed, but I’m sure if they were closed they would not have scheduled appointments. So I checked the door; it was locked. I was so upset as I left, I drove past two other clinics on the way out and I thought to myself again, I wish I could afford good health care so I could just go in and get taken care of. Then I thought, imagine how our people feel and if I ever have the opportunity to change it, I will make it a priority. As a lawyer, we don’t set agendas, we don’t make decisions, we work for our client. The only way to use my lawyer skills supplemented with decision making power is to run for Council.

 

Tue
03
Jul
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Food tax should be cut

By Cathy Brechtelsbauer
S.D. Coordinator for
Bread for the World

For 14 years most South Dakotans have been paying higher tax on their groceries in order to make it possible for South Dakota to win its tax case in the Supreme Court.

How did this happen? The preparation for the state to collect sales tax on online sales caused a significant hike in the food tax. It did not cause a tax increase on anything else, only food.

Before 2003, South Dakota cities had been limited to 1% tax on food. Then, tax “streamlining” rules were needed in order to position the state to tax online sales. The new rules said each city may have only one sales tax rate, even though the rules allowed the state itself to have a lower rate on food, even zero tax.

 

Wed
27
Jun
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Supreme Court decision is win for states’ rights

By Gov. Dennis Daugaard

It’s been a historic week for South Dakota. On Thursday, June 21, the United States Supreme Court announced its decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., ruling in our favor 5-4.

The case stemmed from a bill I signed into law in 2016 which requires online sellers without a physical presence in South Dakota to collect and remit sales tax. The law applies to online sellers with more than $100,000 in South Dakota sales or 200 or more transactions. Several companies, including Amazon, began voluntarily to comply after the law’s passage, while others objected based on the Quill decision issued by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1992.

 

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Wed
27
Jun
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Tariffs could cripple our newspapers

By US Senator Mike Rounds

Our local newspapers play an important role in educating the public and bringing communities together. They are the beating hearts of our towns and cities in South Dakota. We rely on them for updates on local news, wedding and birth announcements, sports, upcoming events and more. Newspapers, especially our local daily or weekly papers, keep us connected to our neighbors and our friends.

I recently met with the South Dakota Newspaper Association (SDNA) to talk about a serious issue that local papers are facing right now—tariffs on Canadian newsprint. During our meeting, SDNA Executive Director David Bordewyk and his colleagues stressed that these tariffs, which are climbing as high as 32 percent, would be devastating to South Dakota newspapers. Around 75 percent of newsprint used to print papers in the United States comes from Canada.

 

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