Commentary

Thu
07
Nov
Edgar's picture

Rural Health Care

Prairie Doc

The elderly patient came back to our rural hospital from a hospital in a nearby larger city after having had major surgery and feeding-tube placement. The care from the bigger hospital was superb except that the patient was getting too much nutrient and fluids and was a bit “overloaded.” Also, the family was concerned that perhaps they had been too aggressive in getting stressful surgery for their elderly mom, whose memory had begun to slip. As her physician, I cut back on the feeding-tube supplements, stopped the intravenous fluids, provided a little diuretic and did labs and X-ray for dementia. I took plenty of time with family and patient learning about their wishes should our patient again deteriorate. All agreed to emphasize comfort from here on out, and if she started to fail, we would do our best in her home hospital and not transfer her care again.

Thu
31
Oct
Edgar's picture

Stay the Course

By Angie Jones

Up and down, up and down. Sometimes our internal state of “wellness” feels like it’s on a yoyo over which we have no control, doesn’t it? We know it requires a daily practice to keep ourselves where we want to be emotionally, psychologically, physically and spiritually. We also know that we are our best, most authentic selves when we can stay centered in the spirit of Love and Openness. Yet, time and again, we fall off the wagon. All it takes is an unkind word, an inconsiderate action, or an overwhelming of fear and anxiety and bam! We’re frustrated, angry, insecure and in danger of throwing everything else that is good in the day out the window.

Thu
31
Oct
Edgar's picture

Walworth Co. jail proposal doesn’t work for Dewey County

Walworth Co. jail proposal doesn’t work for Dewey County

So far, Walworth County’s proposal for six counties to help build a new jail at Selby doesn’t pencil out for Dewey County.

At the Dewey County Commission meeting on October 8, Walworth Co. Commissioner Kevin Holgard presented a proposal which would cost each county $50,000 per year for three years to build a new 40-bed jail, or remodel the existing jail. That amount would guarantee each county 210 prisoner days a year, and additional days would be $95 a day. If they don’t buy into the proposal, the daily rate would be $175, Holgard said.

Dewey County no longer operates its own jail, only a holding cell where prisoners are held for a short time awaiting release or transport.

The figures at right show that for the past three years, Dewey County has spent an average of $23,165 per year to house prisoners out of county, most at Selby. That was for 509 days in 2016 (420 in Selby), 230 days in 2017 and 113 days in 2018.

 

Thu
24
Oct
Edgar's picture

May the First (Amendment) be with you

GUEST COLUMN

When I first started working for this newspaper, it came after a chance meeting with then publisher Jack Stoner who saw me at a friend’s wedding reception. As I poured him a glass of punch, he asked if I had ever considered newspaper reporting. I had not. He then asked if I would consider it. I did.

I started out covering things like ribbon cuttings or new employee introductions — your basic “cub reporter” jobs. Then he sent me out to the river where I reported on an archeological dig. I labored over the story, writing and re-writing before deadline forced me to put it on his desk. He ran the story on the front page above the fold. Seeing my first byline sent my heart soaring past the moon to Orion. It was as if ink had been injected into my veins. I was a reporter.

Thu
17
Oct
Edgar's picture

Stray Thoughts: On Loss

A loss is never so simple as it seems. In the stream of consciousness, we are remembered by acquaintances only from the small pieces of us that drifted by on the surface of a few moments. Through happenstance, they get a glimmer, a hint of who we actually are, or who we allow them to see. Those close to us have seen us swirl in the pools and dip under the surfaces that compose our reality… they have seen the ebb and flow of our presence throughout our gentle meanderings, chaotic rapids and the falls we all experience. They know us now, but know also that we are not who we once were before they knew us. Part of any loss is the realization that we may not have known all we wanted to know, and there is pain in the recognition of our abject ignorance. We may have mistaken small moments for the whole, and there is regret in presupposition without fact. 

 

Thu
17
Oct
Edgar's picture

Celebrating Native American Day

For 29 years, South Dakotans have celebrated Native American Day instead of Columbus Day. The late Governor George Mickelson, along with the editor of the Native Sun News, Tim Giago, and tribal leaders, worked together to proclaim 1990 the Year of Reconciliation. The decision to change Columbus Day to Native American Day was made by the state legislature as a way to honor the deep history of the tribal people who have long called this land their home.

Every year since, we have worked to preserve the culture and history of Native American people, acknowledge our challenges and work together on the issues we face. Native Americans make up around 10 percent of our state’s population, and South Dakota is home to nine tribal reservations. It is important for all South Dakotans to understand the history and hardships that Native Americans have gone through so we can have a better understanding of one another.

 

 

Thu
17
Oct
Edgar's picture

Another successful Native American Day

At Timber Lake, Native American Day is not just another Monday holiday. The last several years, Timber Lake School has organized a day of programs and activities centered on Native American culture and history. Again this year, the teachers and guest presenters prepared a smorgasbord of meaningful activities. It’s part history lesson, part celebration, and part honoring.

In the elementary classes, Tammy LeBeau showed how she uses quills from porcupines to create beautiful designs, Jayme Murray talked about buffalo, and Shanna Gebhardt gave a lesson in Lakota language. Jennifer Schoelerman told about winter counts and helped the students get started on creating one of their own. There were also classes on the Lakota creation story, horses, tipis, and food. Younger students made rainbows, learning the Lakota names of colors as they drew.

 

 

Thu
03
Oct
Edgar's picture

Stray Thoughts: Familiar

Some are good at remembering names, others at remembering faces Most are in the middle, but for me the big riddle Is that I tend to remember people in specific places I’ve had neighbors who lived right beside me, people that I’ve known for a while I may recognize their face, but when they aren’t in their place My mind can’t seem to dig up their file If there’s a person I’ve spoken with often, who over time has helped me a lot When in another town, and without other memories around I’m unlikely to connect all the dots It’s not that I cannot remember, it might impress you… the things that I know But try as I might, I often can’t get this right It’s a limit that just seems to be so My wife is the most curious creature, almost always remembering a name And what was happening on a day, and all events that were in play Compared to me, she’s at the top of her game Women remember things better; at least people, and bir

Thu
03
Oct
Edgar's picture

Prairie Doc Tall Drink of Water

What if there was something you could drink that could help you live longer and was free? Would you drink it? What if I offered something else to drink that could shorten your life and would cost you one dollar? Would you want to buy it?

As you might have guessed, the initial question refers to water, which is healthy and free, for the most part. Meanwhile, the latter question refers to a less desirable alternative, soda pop.

A recent study involving half a million people in Europe found that drinking soda pop was associated with a greater risk of death from any cause. What’s even more interesting is how this study found that both regular and diet soft drinks were bad for your health. Drinking sugar sweetened beverages, such as regular sodas, increases your risk of digestive disease deaths. Meanwhile, drinking artificially sweetened beverages, like diet sodas, increases your risk of dying from cardiovascular diseases.

Thu
19
Sep
Edgar's picture

It’s okay to talk about suicide

September is Suicide Awareness Month

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